Exterior, June 2022
Photo: Yoon S. Byun
Gallery View, Spring 2024
Photo: Kathy Tarantola
Reggie Burrows Hodges
Artist in Residence, Fall 2023
Photo: Neil Evans
Gallery View, Fall 2023
Photo: Julia Featheringill
Elementary School Visit, June 2022
Photo: Jessie Wallner
Gallery view, Spring 2024
Photo: Kathy Tarantola
Gallery View, Spring 2022
Photo: Yoon S. Byun
Today's Hours: 1pm – 5pm

The Addison Gallery, located on the campus of Phillips Academy in Andover, MA, is free and open to the public. Plan your visit >

On View Now

Our Mission

Home to a world-class collection of American art, the Addison Gallery, located on the campus of Phillips Academy in Andover, MA, presents an adventurous exhibition program, hosts a vital artist-in-residence program, and works collaboratively with students and faculty at the Academy and in neighboring communities. Through our ongoing query What is America?, the Addison seeks to engage with the history of American art and American experience—past, present, and future.

Read more >

About Our Collection

25,000+ objects spanning the 18th century to the present

Comprised of more than 25,000 works in all media—painting, sculpture, photography, drawings, prints, and decorative arts—from the 18th century to the present, the Addison Gallery’s collection of American art is one of the most important in the world.

The museum’s founding collection included major works by such prominent American artists as John Singleton Copley, Thomas Eakins, Winslow Homer, Maurice Prendergast, John Singer Sargent, John Twachtman, and James McNeill Whistler.

In the nine decades since, aggressive purchasing and generous gifts have added works by such artists as Mark Bradford, Alexander Calder, Stuart Davis, Arthur Dove, Walker Evans, Robert Frank, Marsden Hartley, Hans Hofmann, Edward Hopper, Kerry James Marshall, Eadweard Muybridge, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jackson Pollock, Charles Sheeler, Lorna Simpson, John Sloan, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Frank Stella, Kara Walker, and Stanley Whitney.

Read more >

1897
Thomas Eakins (1844–1916)
Oil on canvas

Instagram

Coming soon! June Leaf: Shooting from the Heart.⁣
⁣
The Addison Gallery of American Art, @phillipsacademy and the Allen Memorial Art Museum at @oberlincollege are co-organizing a major exhibition devoted to the artist June Leaf (born 1929), whose enigmatic, beguiling, and often irreverent work is both endlessly experimental and uncategorizable. Drawing from the artist’s vast archive along with loans from select private and institutional collections, June Leaf: Shooting from the Heart will consider the breadth of Leaf’s 75-year career. Arranged thematically, it will be the most comprehensive exhibition of the artist’s work in more than three decades. Leaf’s enchanting and provocative sculptures, both kinetic and stationary, paintings, and works on paper will be intermingled and placed in dynamic conversations across media, revealing the artist’s sustained engagement with such motifs and themes as theater and performance, the human drama, dance, gender, motion, urban life, mythology, and interpersonal relationships.⁣
⁣
Accompanied by a publication, the exhibition will debut at the @addisongalleryofamericanart from March 15 through July 31, 2025 before traveling to the @nyugrey (September–December 2025) and the @allenartmuseum (January 27–May 24, 2026).⁣
⁣
June Leaf (born 1929). Shooting from the Heart, 1980. Tin plates, rods, spring, and gears. 18 x 8 inches. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, museum purchase, 1995.62. Photograph by Robert Frank/@leaffrankfoundation 
⁣
#juneleaf #shootingfromtheheart #addisongalleryofamericanart #phillipsacademy #allenmemorialartmuseum #oberlincollege

Coming soon! June Leaf: Shooting from the Heart.⁣

The Addison Gallery of American Art, @phillipsacademy and the Allen Memorial Art Museum at @oberlincollege are co-organizing a major exhibition devoted to the artist June Leaf (born 1929), whose enigmatic, beguiling, and often irreverent work is both endlessly experimental and uncategorizable. Drawing from the artist’s vast archive along with loans from select private and institutional collections, June Leaf: Shooting from the Heart will consider the breadth of Leaf’s 75-year career. Arranged thematically, it will be the most comprehensive exhibition of the artist’s work in more than three decades. Leaf’s enchanting and provocative sculptures, both kinetic and stationary, paintings, and works on paper will be intermingled and placed in dynamic conversations across media, revealing the artist’s sustained engagement with such motifs and themes as theater and performance, the human drama, dance, gender, motion, urban life, mythology, and interpersonal relationships.⁣

Accompanied by a publication, the exhibition will debut at the @addisongalleryofamericanart from March 15 through July 31, 2025 before traveling to the @nyugrey (September–December 2025) and the @allenartmuseum (January 27–May 24, 2026).⁣

June Leaf (born 1929). Shooting from the Heart, 1980. Tin plates, rods, spring, and gears. 18 x 8 inches. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, museum purchase, 1995.62. Photograph by Robert Frank/@leaffrankfoundation

#juneleaf #shootingfromtheheart #addisongalleryofamericanart #phillipsacademy #allenmemorialartmuseum #oberlincollege
...

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We’re thrilled to announce the acquisition of Market by George Tooker (PA 1938). This exceptional work was donated to the Addison by John P. Axelrod (PA 1964) with additional support provided in memory of the late John O’Reilly and Jim Tellin.⁣
⁣
Market, an early masterwork, was executed shortly after the artist’s return from a six-month tour of Europe in 1949. Joined by Paul Cadmus, Tooker’s mentor and lover, the two artists journeyed throughout France, Italy, and England, visiting countless museums, monuments, and works in situ during their extended sojourn. Tooker’s firsthand, intimate experiences with early Renaissance masterworks had a profound impact on the burgeoning painter’s career and aesthetic trajectory. Arriving back in the United States with a slew of reproductions of key works encountered during his travels, Tooker set about digesting and assimilating the lessons of the Renaissance, creating Market as both a paean to Quattrocento masters and a forceful early manifestation of the artist’s singular, idiosyncratic style.⁣
⁣
While Tooker appropriated aesthetic lessons from the past, the painting is decidedly contemporary—not simply due to the inclusion of a glittering skyscraper peeking through receding awnings. Tooker’s figures do not exist within a precisely proportioned, controlled classical exterior but, instead, occupy a bustling and sophisticatedly rendered open market, inspired by those he encountered near his Bleecker Street home in Greenwich Village. Market defamiliarizes the urban landscape, offering a claustrophobic vision of midcentury America, one that surfaces a pervasive sense of alienation and loneliness. Tooker’s figures appear lost in contemplation or simply disinterested, staring into space while they perform their prescribed societal roles—shopkeeper, matron, stockboy—like automata, the boisterous and convivial space of an open market distilled into a series of rote interactions.⁣
⁣
George Tooker (1920-2011). Market, 1949. Egg tempera on gesso panel. 22 x 22 inches.  Gift of John P. Axelrod (PA 1964) and partial museum purchase in memory of John O’Reilly and Jim Tellin, 2024.99⁣
⁣
#georgetooker #addisongalleryofamericanart

We’re thrilled to announce the acquisition of Market by George Tooker (PA 1938). This exceptional work was donated to the Addison by John P. Axelrod (PA 1964) with additional support provided in memory of the late John O’Reilly and Jim Tellin.⁣

Market, an early masterwork, was executed shortly after the artist’s return from a six-month tour of Europe in 1949. Joined by Paul Cadmus, Tooker’s mentor and lover, the two artists journeyed throughout France, Italy, and England, visiting countless museums, monuments, and works in situ during their extended sojourn. Tooker’s firsthand, intimate experiences with early Renaissance masterworks had a profound impact on the burgeoning painter’s career and aesthetic trajectory. Arriving back in the United States with a slew of reproductions of key works encountered during his travels, Tooker set about digesting and assimilating the lessons of the Renaissance, creating Market as both a paean to Quattrocento masters and a forceful early manifestation of the artist’s singular, idiosyncratic style.⁣

While Tooker appropriated aesthetic lessons from the past, the painting is decidedly contemporary—not simply due to the inclusion of a glittering skyscraper peeking through receding awnings. Tooker’s figures do not exist within a precisely proportioned, controlled classical exterior but, instead, occupy a bustling and sophisticatedly rendered open market, inspired by those he encountered near his Bleecker Street home in Greenwich Village. Market defamiliarizes the urban landscape, offering a claustrophobic vision of midcentury America, one that surfaces a pervasive sense of alienation and loneliness. Tooker’s figures appear lost in contemplation or simply disinterested, staring into space while they perform their prescribed societal roles—shopkeeper, matron, stockboy—like automata, the boisterous and convivial space of an open market distilled into a series of rote interactions.⁣

George Tooker (1920-2011). Market, 1949. Egg tempera on gesso panel. 22 x 22 inches. Gift of John P. Axelrod (PA 1964) and partial museum purchase in memory of John O’Reilly and Jim Tellin, 2024.99⁣

#georgetooker #addisongalleryofamericanart
...

144 6
One of the most impactful and innovative artists of our time, Frank Stella (1936-2024) consistently challenged the boundaries of painting and the potential of abstraction. While there is an undeniable thread of logic running from one body of work to the next, the steadfast and dramatic evolution of his art from early disciplined minimalist paintings to the later dynamic, baroque—even explosive—compositions attest to the artist’s extraordinary expansiveness. As the late art historian Bill Agee wrote, Stella offered “one surprise after another that [has] always pointed to new directions and possibilities.”⁣
 ⁣
The Addison is fortunate to have had a long and meaningful relationship with Stella, as an alum (PA 1954), exhibiting artist, artist-in-residence, donor, and board member. The Addison’s collection includes 106 objects (paintings, sculpture, prints, and works on paper) by Stella.

Stella’s experience at @phillipsacademy was crucial to his formation as an artist. It was here that he began to seriously pursue art, studying along with classmates Carl Andre and Hollis Frampton, under the guidance of faulty members Patrick Morgan, and Gordon (Diz) Bensley. As he took art classes in the basement of the museum and learned from the collections in its galleries, Stella found great inspiration in the Addison’s environment. Stella would note in 1982 that the art program at Phillips Academy “would never have been the same without the Addison Gallery…Art education must be a felt presence; you must observe real things. It just doesn’t work to see everything secondhand, through slides and photographs.”⁣
 ⁣
Later he added, “If a young person walks through a gallery of American painting in the 1950 and confronts the work of Copley, Inness, Sargent, Eakins, Remington, Homer, Dove, Hartley, Hofmann, Pollock, and Kline he will want to paint like Hofmann, Pollock, and Kline, admiring Hartley and Dove for the proximity to the former, and acknowledging the rest for their accomplishment and effort in facing the task of art. Looking at what happened and is happening, one has to want to do what is happening. Immediate sources count for a lot.”⁣
⁣
#frankstella #phillipsacademy

One of the most impactful and innovative artists of our time, Frank Stella (1936-2024) consistently challenged the boundaries of painting and the potential of abstraction. While there is an undeniable thread of logic running from one body of work to the next, the steadfast and dramatic evolution of his art from early disciplined minimalist paintings to the later dynamic, baroque—even explosive—compositions attest to the artist’s extraordinary expansiveness. As the late art historian Bill Agee wrote, Stella offered “one surprise after another that [has] always pointed to new directions and possibilities.”⁣

The Addison is fortunate to have had a long and meaningful relationship with Stella, as an alum (PA 1954), exhibiting artist, artist-in-residence, donor, and board member. The Addison’s collection includes 106 objects (paintings, sculpture, prints, and works on paper) by Stella.

Stella’s experience at @phillipsacademy was crucial to his formation as an artist. It was here that he began to seriously pursue art, studying along with classmates Carl Andre and Hollis Frampton, under the guidance of faulty members Patrick Morgan, and Gordon (Diz) Bensley. As he took art classes in the basement of the museum and learned from the collections in its galleries, Stella found great inspiration in the Addison’s environment. Stella would note in 1982 that the art program at Phillips Academy “would never have been the same without the Addison Gallery…Art education must be a felt presence; you must observe real things. It just doesn’t work to see everything secondhand, through slides and photographs.”⁣

Later he added, “If a young person walks through a gallery of American painting in the 1950 and confronts the work of Copley, Inness, Sargent, Eakins, Remington, Homer, Dove, Hartley, Hofmann, Pollock, and Kline he will want to paint like Hofmann, Pollock, and Kline, admiring Hartley and Dove for the proximity to the former, and acknowledging the rest for their accomplishment and effort in facing the task of art. Looking at what happened and is happening, one has to want to do what is happening. Immediate sources count for a lot.”⁣

#frankstella #phillipsacademy
...

389 22
We’re thrilled to announce that Tommy Kha is the recipient of the Addison Artist Council’s 2025 Bartlett H. Hayes Jr. Prize! ⁣
⁣
The Addison Artist Council (AAC) launched the Hayes Prize in 2022 to provide important⁣ institutional support to American artists. Through this initiative, the Addison will organize Kha’s first solo exhibition at a collecting institution (to open in September 2025), with an accompanying publication, an⁣ artist’s residency, and an acquisition of Kha’s work for the museum’s permanent collection.⁣
⁣
Born in Memphis, Tennessee, Kha lives and works between Brooklyn, New York, and Memphis. With a humorous and poignant touch, Kha examines how we construct belonging and otherness through photography, inventing new models for self-portraiture with a critical eye toward the medium’s long history of absences and erasure. Growing up as a queer Chinese-⁣Vietnamese American in Memphis, Kha was made to feel othered; as an adult the artist claims a place for himself within both the American South and the tradition of photography. Critical of the ways in which photography has been used to construct and perpetuate narratives that exclude or misrepresent, Kha has found a model of picture-making through which he⁣ maintains agency as a subject while simultaneously questioning the construction of the “self.” In his ongoing project I’m Only Here to Leave (2015–present), the artist creates cardboard cut-outs and prosthetic masks of his own face and photographs them, complicating and fracturing his representation.⁣
⁣
“With his exploration of representation, identity, and the history of photography, Tommy Kha is an ideal choice to receive the Hayes Prize. His perspective and investigation of the American experience will resonate with many students and visitors. We are proud to support artists like Kha who are making exceptional contributions in the visual arts, at a moment in their career when such support can have a lasting impact.” said Allison Kemmerer, the Addison’s Mary Stripp and R.⁣ Crosby Kemper Director.⁣
⁣
Please join us in congratulating @tommykha!⁣
⁣
Tommy Kha, Constellations (XVIII), Whitehaven, Memphis, 2019⁣
⁣
#tommykha #hayesprize

We’re thrilled to announce that Tommy Kha is the recipient of the Addison Artist Council’s 2025 Bartlett H. Hayes Jr. Prize! ⁣

The Addison Artist Council (AAC) launched the Hayes Prize in 2022 to provide important⁣ institutional support to American artists. Through this initiative, the Addison will organize Kha’s first solo exhibition at a collecting institution (to open in September 2025), with an accompanying publication, an⁣ artist’s residency, and an acquisition of Kha’s work for the museum’s permanent collection.⁣

Born in Memphis, Tennessee, Kha lives and works between Brooklyn, New York, and Memphis. With a humorous and poignant touch, Kha examines how we construct belonging and otherness through photography, inventing new models for self-portraiture with a critical eye toward the medium’s long history of absences and erasure. Growing up as a queer Chinese-⁣Vietnamese American in Memphis, Kha was made to feel othered; as an adult the artist claims a place for himself within both the American South and the tradition of photography. Critical of the ways in which photography has been used to construct and perpetuate narratives that exclude or misrepresent, Kha has found a model of picture-making through which he⁣ maintains agency as a subject while simultaneously questioning the construction of the “self.” In his ongoing project I’m Only Here to Leave (2015–present), the artist creates cardboard cut-outs and prosthetic masks of his own face and photographs them, complicating and fracturing his representation.⁣

“With his exploration of representation, identity, and the history of photography, Tommy Kha is an ideal choice to receive the Hayes Prize. His perspective and investigation of the American experience will resonate with many students and visitors. We are proud to support artists like Kha who are making exceptional contributions in the visual arts, at a moment in their career when such support can have a lasting impact.” said Allison Kemmerer, the Addison’s Mary Stripp and R.⁣ Crosby Kemper Director.⁣

Please join us in congratulating @tommykha!⁣

Tommy Kha, Constellations (XVIII), Whitehaven, Memphis, 2019⁣

#tommykha #hayesprize
...

181 6
Addison Late ‘til 8 is this Friday, 5/3! Join us for evening open hours, 5-8pm. Drop in to explore the exhibitions, make art with Edward E. Elson Artist-in-Residence Jennifer Cecere (@cecerejen), and view her site-specific installation on the Addison’s facade. Free and open to the public. We hope to see you there!⁣
⁣
Generous support for Jennifer Cecere’s installation is provided by the Abbot Academy Fund, continuing Abbot’s tradition of boldness, innovation, and caring.⁣
⁣
#jennifercecere⁣ #abbotacadamy #phillipsacademy #outdoorsculpture #patternanddecoration #americanart #whatisamerica #addisongalleryofamericanart #doily #crochet #womenswork

Addison Late ‘til 8 is this Friday, 5/3! Join us for evening open hours, 5-8pm. Drop in to explore the exhibitions, make art with Edward E. Elson Artist-in-Residence Jennifer Cecere (@cecerejen), and view her site-specific installation on the Addison’s facade. Free and open to the public. We hope to see you there!⁣

Generous support for Jennifer Cecere’s installation is provided by the Abbot Academy Fund, continuing Abbot’s tradition of boldness, innovation, and caring.⁣

#jennifercecere⁣ #abbotacadamy #phillipsacademy #outdoorsculpture #patternanddecoration #americanart #whatisamerica #addisongalleryofamericanart #doily #crochet #womenswork
...

105 4
We’re beyond thrilled to announce the April 27th debut of two large-scale, site-specific installations by Jennifer Cecere commissioned in honor of Abbot & Andover at 50: Then, Now, Next! ⁣
⁣
“Abbot & Andover at 50” aims to recognize the legacy of Abbot Academy, one of the first educational institutions in New England founded for girls and women, and the ways it has impacted the Andover community. Cecere, a member of the Abbot Academy Class of 1969, has spent much of her career creating works of art that activate public spaces while challenging traditional perspectives on “women’s work.” Long associated with the Pattern and Decoration movement, which challenged hierarchies by referencing marginalized artistic traditions like quilting, metalwork, and embroidery, Cecere is best known for bold pieces that embrace and reimagine the domestic doily. For centuries, these accessories protected furniture, added decorative touches, and showcased women’s needlework skills. In Cecere’s installations, free from the constraints of household spaces, the doilies take on a much larger role.⁣
 ⁣
For “Abbot & Andover at 50,” Cecere has created works that recontextualize the humble lace ornament and dynamically link both campuses. Abbot Doily Bench, which takes the shape of an accordion-folded doily and is over nine feet long, five feet wide, and eight feet high, will be displayed on the grounds of the original Abbot campus, while Women’s Work, 20 feet in diameter, will hang on the façade of the Addison on the original Andover campus. Together, the two laser-cut aluminum pieces encourage reconsideration of the habitually overlooked contributions of women artists and, by extension, the often underappreciated yet lasting impact of Abbot Academy on the culture and traditions of Phillips Academy.⁣
 ⁣
There will be many opportunities to engage with @cecerejen and her incredible work this spring and summer. Stay tuned for more information!⁣
⁣
Generous support for these installations has been provided by the Abbot Academy Fund, continuing Abbot’s tradition of boldness, innovation, and caring.⁣
⁣
#jennifercecere #abbotacademyfund #abbotacademy #patternanddecoration #andover #publicart

We’re beyond thrilled to announce the April 27th debut of two large-scale, site-specific installations by Jennifer Cecere commissioned in honor of Abbot & Andover at 50: Then, Now, Next! ⁣

“Abbot & Andover at 50” aims to recognize the legacy of Abbot Academy, one of the first educational institutions in New England founded for girls and women, and the ways it has impacted the Andover community. Cecere, a member of the Abbot Academy Class of 1969, has spent much of her career creating works of art that activate public spaces while challenging traditional perspectives on “women’s work.” Long associated with the Pattern and Decoration movement, which challenged hierarchies by referencing marginalized artistic traditions like quilting, metalwork, and embroidery, Cecere is best known for bold pieces that embrace and reimagine the domestic doily. For centuries, these accessories protected furniture, added decorative touches, and showcased women’s needlework skills. In Cecere’s installations, free from the constraints of household spaces, the doilies take on a much larger role.⁣

For “Abbot & Andover at 50,” Cecere has created works that recontextualize the humble lace ornament and dynamically link both campuses. Abbot Doily Bench, which takes the shape of an accordion-folded doily and is over nine feet long, five feet wide, and eight feet high, will be displayed on the grounds of the original Abbot campus, while Women’s Work, 20 feet in diameter, will hang on the façade of the Addison on the original Andover campus. Together, the two laser-cut aluminum pieces encourage reconsideration of the habitually overlooked contributions of women artists and, by extension, the often underappreciated yet lasting impact of Abbot Academy on the culture and traditions of Phillips Academy.⁣

There will be many opportunities to engage with @cecerejen and her incredible work this spring and summer. Stay tuned for more information!⁣

Generous support for these installations has been provided by the Abbot Academy Fund, continuing Abbot’s tradition of boldness, innovation, and caring.⁣

#jennifercecere #abbotacademyfund #abbotacademy #patternanddecoration #andover #publicart
...

193 14
Crank up the Bonnie Tyler because it’s eclipse day in America! Don’t follow the example of a certain former president by staring directly at the sun. Wear your protective eyewear and try to avoid thinking about how—within a week—we’ve seen the Statue of Liberty get struck by lightning followed by an earthquake followed by an eclipse. The medieval peasant in me is freaking out. 
⁣
Unidentified photographer. Viewing the solar eclipse in France, 1961. Gelatin silver print. Gift of W.M. Hunt⁣
⁣
#eclipse #totaleclipseoftheheart #bonnietyler #eclipse2024 #fourhorsemen #protectiveeyewear #vintagefrance #livinginapowderkegandgivingoffsparks #americanart #whatisamerica #addisongalleryofamericanart

Crank up the Bonnie Tyler because it’s eclipse day in America! Don’t follow the example of a certain former president by staring directly at the sun. Wear your protective eyewear and try to avoid thinking about how—within a week—we’ve seen the Statue of Liberty get struck by lightning followed by an earthquake followed by an eclipse. The medieval peasant in me is freaking out.

Unidentified photographer. Viewing the solar eclipse in France, 1961. Gelatin silver print. Gift of W.M. Hunt⁣

#eclipse #totaleclipseoftheheart #bonnietyler #eclipse2024 #fourhorsemen #protectiveeyewear #vintagefrance #livinginapowderkegandgivingoffsparks #americanart #whatisamerica #addisongalleryofamericanart
...

120 0
Did you feel that earthquake? We didn’t…but we refuse to fall behind in the museum meme arms race. We allowed the Whitney to post a Donald Judd after the Kim Kardashian fiasco before we did and we will not stand by and let that happen to us again!⁣
⁣
Ralph Eugene Meatyard (1925-1972). Untitled (Motion-Sound Landscape), 1969. Gelatin silver print. Museum purchase, 1974.22.9⁣
⁣
#ralpheugenemeatyard #earthquake #eastcoastearthquake #dinalohan #southernphotography #meatyard #topicalpost #americanart #whatisamerica #addisongalleryofamericanart

Did you feel that earthquake? We didn’t…but we refuse to fall behind in the museum meme arms race. We allowed the Whitney to post a Donald Judd after the Kim Kardashian fiasco before we did and we will not stand by and let that happen to us again!⁣

Ralph Eugene Meatyard (1925-1972). Untitled (Motion-Sound Landscape), 1969. Gelatin silver print. Museum purchase, 1974.22.9⁣

#ralpheugenemeatyard #earthquake #eastcoastearthquake #dinalohan #southernphotography #meatyard #topicalpost #americanart #whatisamerica #addisongalleryofamericanart
...

182 13

Addison Stories

Addison Artist Council logo

Bartlett H. Hayes Prize Recipients

2023:

Reggie Burrows Hodges

Exhibition | Residency | Publication | Acquisition

2025:

Tommy Kha

Exhibition | Residency | Publication | Acquisition