Photo: Yoon S. Byun
Photo: Yoon S. Byun
Photo: Jessie Wallner
Photo: Yoon S. Byun
Photo: Yoon S. Byun

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Today's Hours: 10am – 5pm

Our Mission

Home to a world-class collection of American art, the Addison Gallery, located on the campus of Phillips Academy in Andover, MA, presents an adventurous exhibition program, hosts a vital artist-in-residence program, and works collaboratively with students and faculty at the Academy and in neighboring communities. Through our ongoing query What is America?, the Addison seeks to engage with the history of American art and American experience—past, present, and future.

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About Our Collection

25,000 objects spanning the 18th century to the present

Comprised of more than 25,000 works in all media—painting, sculpture, photography, drawings, prints, and decorative arts—from the 18th century to the present, the Addison Gallery’s collection of American art is one of the most important in the world. 

The museum’s founding collection included major works by such prominent American artists as John Singleton Copley, Thomas Eakins, Winslow Homer, Maurice Prendergast, John Singer Sargent, John Twachtman, and James McNeill Whistler.

In the nine decades since, aggressive purchasing and generous gifts have added works by such artists as Mark Bradford, Alexander Calder, Stuart Davis, Arthur Dove, Walker Evans, Robert Frank, Marsden Hartley, Hans Hofmann, Edward Hopper, Kerry James Marshall, Eadweard Muybridge, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jackson Pollock, Charles Sheeler, Lorna Simpson, John Sloan, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Frank Stella, Kara Walker, and Stanley Whitney.

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1897
Thomas Eakins (1844–1916)
Oil on canvas

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The Addison will be closed tomorrow, November 24th, in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. ⁣
⁣
Looking for additional ways to avoid talking about politics with your extended family? Bring them to the Addison! Normal hours resume on Friday at 10:00.⁣
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Enoch Wood Perry (1831-1915). Preparing for Thanksgiving Dinner, 1872. Oil on canvas. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1954.6⁣
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#enochwoodperry #thanksgiving #genrepainting #19thcenturyart #americanart #whatisamerica #addisongalleryofamericanart

The Addison will be closed tomorrow, November 24th, in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. ⁣

Looking for additional ways to avoid talking about politics with your extended family? Bring them to the Addison! Normal hours resume on Friday at 10:00.⁣

Enoch Wood Perry (1831-1915). Preparing for Thanksgiving Dinner, 1872. Oil on canvas. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1954.6⁣

#enochwoodperry #thanksgiving #genrepainting #19thcenturyart #americanart #whatisamerica #addisongalleryofamericanart
...

Please join us on Zoom at 6:00 EST on Thursday, December 1st for “The Art of HIV/AIDS.”⁣
⁣
Organized by Dr. Tanya Sheehan (PA 1994), New Perspectives: The Collection in Dialogue presents a series of virtual talks by leading scholars of American art that focus on the Addison’s collection. The first lecture in the series takes place on World AIDS Day. The Addison has amassed a strong collection of artworks produced by Americans during the AIDS crisis of the 1980s and by artists who continue to be impacted by HIV/AIDS. This includes the work of Mark Morrisroe, Hunter Reynolds, Eric Rhein, Tim Rollins and K.O.S., David Wojnarowicz, and others. In conversation will be Fiona Johnstone (Durham University), author of the forthcoming book AIDS and Representation: Portraits and Self-Portraits During the AIDS Crisis in America, and Jonathan Katz, curator of numerous exhibitions on the art of HIV/AIDS including Art AIDS America (2015).⁣
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Please visit the link in our bio to register for this free virtual program!⁣
⁣
Generous support for New Perspectives: The Collection in Dialogue has been provided by the Lana Lobell Fund and the Alumni/Alumnae Lectureship Fund.⁣
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Tim Rollins (1955-2017) and K.O.S. A Journal of the Plague Year, 1988. Mixed media on canvas. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, Gift of Robert and Evelyn Doran, 2017.15⁣
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#timrollins #timrollinsandkos #hivaids #artandaids #markmorrisroe #hunterreynolds #ericrhein #davidwojnarowicz #journaloftheplagueyear @ericrheinart #americanart #whatisamerica #addisongalleryofamericanart

Please join us on Zoom at 6:00 EST on Thursday, December 1st for “The Art of HIV/AIDS.”⁣

Organized by Dr. Tanya Sheehan (PA 1994), New Perspectives: The Collection in Dialogue presents a series of virtual talks by leading scholars of American art that focus on the Addison’s collection. The first lecture in the series takes place on World AIDS Day. The Addison has amassed a strong collection of artworks produced by Americans during the AIDS crisis of the 1980s and by artists who continue to be impacted by HIV/AIDS. This includes the work of Mark Morrisroe, Hunter Reynolds, Eric Rhein, Tim Rollins and K.O.S., David Wojnarowicz, and others. In conversation will be Fiona Johnstone (Durham University), author of the forthcoming book AIDS and Representation: Portraits and Self-Portraits During the AIDS Crisis in America, and Jonathan Katz, curator of numerous exhibitions on the art of HIV/AIDS including Art AIDS America (2015).⁣

Please visit the link in our bio to register for this free virtual program!⁣

Generous support for New Perspectives: The Collection in Dialogue has been provided by the Lana Lobell Fund and the Alumni/Alumnae Lectureship Fund.⁣

Tim Rollins (1955-2017) and K.O.S. A Journal of the Plague Year, 1988. Mixed media on canvas. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, Gift of Robert and Evelyn Doran, 2017.15⁣

#timrollins #timrollinsandkos #hivaids #artandaids #markmorrisroe #hunterreynolds #ericrhein #davidwojnarowicz #journaloftheplagueyear @ericrheinart #americanart #whatisamerica #addisongalleryofamericanart
...

“Wait, but I thought you were a Verified Fan?”⁣
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Attributed to John Trumbull (1756-1843). Early American Swifties Crying after Failed Attempts to Secure Taylor Swift Tickets, undated. Graphite on paper. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1934.61⁣
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This post took ⅓ of one All Too Well (10 Minute Version) (Taylor’s Version) to conceptualize and execute. ⁣
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#taylorswift #swifties #alltoowell #taylorsversion #jakegyllenhaal #scarf #ticketmaster #teardropsonmyguitar #taylorswiftfans #earlyamerican #johntrumbull #americandrawing #privatejet

“Wait, but I thought you were a Verified Fan?”⁣

Attributed to John Trumbull (1756-1843). Early American Swifties Crying after Failed Attempts to Secure Taylor Swift Tickets, undated. Graphite on paper. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1934.61⁣

This post took ⅓ of one All Too Well (10 Minute Version) (Taylor’s Version) to conceptualize and execute. ⁣

#taylorswift #swifties #alltoowell #taylorsversion #jakegyllenhaal #scarf #ticketmaster #teardropsonmyguitar #taylorswiftfans #earlyamerican #johntrumbull #americandrawing #privatejet
...

“I found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn't say any other way - things I had no words for.” —Georgia O’Keeffe⁣
⁣
Georgia O’Keeffe was born on this day in 1887 in Sun Prairie, Wisconsin. Produced in 1919, this striking charcoal composition marks a pivotal moment in O’Keeffe’s early career. After exploring the expressive possibility of the flatness of the picture plane with lush pools of watercolor and swirling charcoal abstractions in nearly one hundred fifty works on paper from 1915 to 1918, O’Keeffe arrived in New York in June 1918 to a creative rebirth in which she destroyed a number of these earlier works and delved into a wholly new investigation of form through oil painting to achieve a personal imagery.⁣
 ⁣
A rare work on paper from this early oil painting phase, Black Lines synthesizes both O’Keeffe’s mastery of flat tone from her previous work and her initial experimentation with tight-cropped, cleanly contoured volumes that would emerge as her stylistic signature. With two sharp black bolts piercing through a defined edge into a smoothly shaded volume, the work resonates with a powerful tension between the abstract weight of light and dark, sharp flatness and smooth volume, and motion and stillness. Considering the resulting image in light of her later enlargements of flower details, we can let ourselves imagine what this pure abstraction might be: a puncture? a bee sting? a piercing note of music? (Jen Mergel, On Paper: Masterworks from the Addison Collection)⁣
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Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986). Black Lines, 1919. Charcoal on paper. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1959.22⁣
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#georgiaokeeffe #okeeffe #charcoal #abstraction #abstractart #blacklines #drawing #womenartists #5womenartists #whatisamerica #americanart #addisongalleryofamericanart #modernism #americanmodernism #modernart #earlyabstraction

“I found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn't say any other way - things I had no words for.” —Georgia O’Keeffe⁣

Georgia O’Keeffe was born on this day in 1887 in Sun Prairie, Wisconsin. Produced in 1919, this striking charcoal composition marks a pivotal moment in O’Keeffe’s early career. After exploring the expressive possibility of the flatness of the picture plane with lush pools of watercolor and swirling charcoal abstractions in nearly one hundred fifty works on paper from 1915 to 1918, O’Keeffe arrived in New York in June 1918 to a creative rebirth in which she destroyed a number of these earlier works and delved into a wholly new investigation of form through oil painting to achieve a personal imagery.⁣

A rare work on paper from this early oil painting phase, Black Lines synthesizes both O’Keeffe’s mastery of flat tone from her previous work and her initial experimentation with tight-cropped, cleanly contoured volumes that would emerge as her stylistic signature. With two sharp black bolts piercing through a defined edge into a smoothly shaded volume, the work resonates with a powerful tension between the abstract weight of light and dark, sharp flatness and smooth volume, and motion and stillness. Considering the resulting image in light of her later enlargements of flower details, we can let ourselves imagine what this pure abstraction might be: a puncture? a bee sting? a piercing note of music? (Jen Mergel, On Paper: Masterworks from the Addison Collection)⁣

Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986). Black Lines, 1919. Charcoal on paper. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1959.22⁣

#georgiaokeeffe #okeeffe #charcoal #abstraction #abstractart #blacklines #drawing #womenartists #5womenartists #whatisamerica #americanart #addisongalleryofamericanart #modernism #americanmodernism #modernart #earlyabstraction
...

“Some of us look forward to a great and alive American art. We look forward to a great and alive art in the Middle West, but be reminded of this—the great art is within yourself—within your own heart is the secret of the power that will attract your fellow men.” —John Steuart Curry⁣
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John Steuart Curry, the great American Regionalist painter, was born on a farm in Dunavant, Kansas on this day in 1897. Famed for his often fraught, unvarnished depictions of contemporary rural life in Kansas and for his engagement with the violent Bleeding Kansas period, Curry’s work was controversial in his home state. ⁣
⁣
This masterful drawing was executed shortly after Curry spent several weeks traveling around the Northeast with the Ringling Bros.⁣ and Barnum & Bailey Circus. In search of a “new viewpoint of life,” Curry found inspiration of a number of important prints and paintings. Particularly interested bits the remarkable bulk of the circus elephants, he was fascinated by their “shining beady eyes,” finding it “a little disconcerting to see this brilliant animation in such a massive form.” ⁣
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John Steuart Curry (1897-1946). Elephants, 1933. Crayon and graphite on paper. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1935.31⁣
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#johnsteuartcurry #regionalism #elephant #ringlingbros #circus #greatdepression #kansasartist #americanart #whatisamerica #addisongalleryofamericanart

“Some of us look forward to a great and alive American art. We look forward to a great and alive art in the Middle West, but be reminded of this—the great art is within yourself—within your own heart is the secret of the power that will attract your fellow men.” —John Steuart Curry⁣

John Steuart Curry, the great American Regionalist painter, was born on a farm in Dunavant, Kansas on this day in 1897. Famed for his often fraught, unvarnished depictions of contemporary rural life in Kansas and for his engagement with the violent Bleeding Kansas period, Curry’s work was controversial in his home state. ⁣

This masterful drawing was executed shortly after Curry spent several weeks traveling around the Northeast with the Ringling Bros.⁣ and Barnum & Bailey Circus. In search of a “new viewpoint of life,” Curry found inspiration of a number of important prints and paintings. Particularly interested bits the remarkable bulk of the circus elephants, he was fascinated by their “shining beady eyes,” finding it “a little disconcerting to see this brilliant animation in such a massive form.” ⁣

John Steuart Curry (1897-1946). Elephants, 1933. Crayon and graphite on paper. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1935.31⁣

#johnsteuartcurry #regionalism #elephant #ringlingbros #circus #greatdepression #kansasartist #americanart #whatisamerica #addisongalleryofamericanart
...

“Above all, life for a photographer cannot be a matter of indifference” ― Robert Frank⁣
⁣
The great Swiss-American photographer, filmmaker, and former Edward E. Elson Artist-in-Residence Robert Frank was born on this day in 1924 in Zurich. ⁣
⁣
The Addison holds one of the most significant institutional collections of Frank’s work and is also one of only four museums in the world to hold a complete set of prints from his seminal series The Americans. ⁣
⁣
First published in France in 1958, then in the United States in 1959 at the height of the Cold War, Robert Frank’s The Americans is one of the most important and influential photography books of the twentieth century.⁣
⁣
In 1955-56, a Guggenheim Fellowship allowed Frank to travel throughout the United States with the goal of creating a book of photographs that he described as a “visual study of a civilization.” An outsider looking in, Frank’s dark and grainy photographs reveal his ambivalence toward his new country. Edited down from thousands, the eighty-three carefully sequenced photographs are a raw and insightful documentation of a country in transition, both celebrating its strengths and exposing the cracks in the veneer of hope and optimism that defined postwar culture. As Jack Kerouac wrote in the introduction to the book, “Robert Frank, Swiss, unobtrusive, nice, with that little camera that he raises and snaps with one hand, he sucked a sad poem right out of America onto film.” ⁣
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Robert Frank (1924-2019). Rodeo—Detroit from The Americans, neg. 1955-56, print c. 1981. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1989.77.5⁣/©Andrea Frank Foundation
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#robertfrank #theamericans #whatisamerica #americanart #photobook #rodeo #detroit #1950s #documentaryphotography #addisongalleryofamericanart

“Above all, life for a photographer cannot be a matter of indifference” ― Robert Frank⁣

The great Swiss-American photographer, filmmaker, and former Edward E. Elson Artist-in-Residence Robert Frank was born on this day in 1924 in Zurich. ⁣

The Addison holds one of the most significant institutional collections of Frank’s work and is also one of only four museums in the world to hold a complete set of prints from his seminal series The Americans. ⁣

First published in France in 1958, then in the United States in 1959 at the height of the Cold War, Robert Frank’s The Americans is one of the most important and influential photography books of the twentieth century.⁣

In 1955-56, a Guggenheim Fellowship allowed Frank to travel throughout the United States with the goal of creating a book of photographs that he described as a “visual study of a civilization.” An outsider looking in, Frank’s dark and grainy photographs reveal his ambivalence toward his new country. Edited down from thousands, the eighty-three carefully sequenced photographs are a raw and insightful documentation of a country in transition, both celebrating its strengths and exposing the cracks in the veneer of hope and optimism that defined postwar culture. As Jack Kerouac wrote in the introduction to the book, “Robert Frank, Swiss, unobtrusive, nice, with that little camera that he raises and snaps with one hand, he sucked a sad poem right out of America onto film.” ⁣

Robert Frank (1924-2019). Rodeo—Detroit from The Americans, neg. 1955-56, print c. 1981. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1989.77.5⁣/©Andrea Frank Foundation

#robertfrank #theamericans #whatisamerica #americanart #photobook #rodeo #detroit #1950s #documentaryphotography #addisongalleryofamericanart
...

Charles Demuth, the great American modernist, was born on this day in 1883 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Honor Demuth by gazing upon his masterful Plums.⁣
⁣
Behind the simple naturalism of Plums is a sophisticated, Cubist-inspired compositional strategy that Demuth had developed in his architectural subjects of the late teens. The watercolor focuses on a vertical slice of space, describing a section of a tree in fruit. The leaves are painted with diaphanous washes that evoke flickering sunlight and the suggestion of a breeze. The plum-laden branches, springy with tension, bend down in a seemingly artless succession of graceful curves, while at the same time overlapping leaves and branches form a pyramid that reaches to the top of the sheet. The baroque voluptuousness of the design is undercut by edges that are softened and richly colored areas that fade into the white paper. Branches and foliage consolidate in the center against a deep, liquid ground, and then dissolve. Leaves that are outlined but left unpainted and branches that trail off into pale washes of color and wispy pencil lines dematerialize the image, even as the rich, juicy plums proclaim its solidity. ⁣
⁣
Like most of the still lifes Demuth produced during this period, Plums was painted in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and may represent a tree he saw from his studio on the second floor of his mother's house. Lancaster and the family home were security for him, a place where he could recover and regain his strength after debilitating bouts of diabetes. The critic Henry McBride, who visited Demuth in Lancaster, noted that the artist treasured the "cloistered serenity" of his mother's garden. It enabled him to "confront that 'oblique place,' the modern world.” Plums demonstrates Demuth's ability to engage the modern in an image marked by serenity, elegance, and naturalistic ease. (Carol Troyen)⁣
⁣
Charles Demuth (1883-1935). Plums, 1925. Watercolor and graphite on paper. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1934.5⁣
⁣
#charlesdemuth #americanmodernism #watercolor #plums #americanart #whatisamerica #addisongalleryofamericanart

Charles Demuth, the great American modernist, was born on this day in 1883 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Honor Demuth by gazing upon his masterful Plums.⁣

Behind the simple naturalism of Plums is a sophisticated, Cubist-inspired compositional strategy that Demuth had developed in his architectural subjects of the late teens. The watercolor focuses on a vertical slice of space, describing a section of a tree in fruit. The leaves are painted with diaphanous washes that evoke flickering sunlight and the suggestion of a breeze. The plum-laden branches, springy with tension, bend down in a seemingly artless succession of graceful curves, while at the same time overlapping leaves and branches form a pyramid that reaches to the top of the sheet. The baroque voluptuousness of the design is undercut by edges that are softened and richly colored areas that fade into the white paper. Branches and foliage consolidate in the center against a deep, liquid ground, and then dissolve. Leaves that are outlined but left unpainted and branches that trail off into pale washes of color and wispy pencil lines dematerialize the image, even as the rich, juicy plums proclaim its solidity. ⁣

Like most of the still lifes Demuth produced during this period, Plums was painted in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and may represent a tree he saw from his studio on the second floor of his mother's house. Lancaster and the family home were security for him, a place where he could recover and regain his strength after debilitating bouts of diabetes. The critic Henry McBride, who visited Demuth in Lancaster, noted that the artist treasured the "cloistered serenity" of his mother's garden. It enabled him to "confront that 'oblique place,' the modern world.” Plums demonstrates Demuth's ability to engage the modern in an image marked by serenity, elegance, and naturalistic ease. (Carol Troyen)⁣

Charles Demuth (1883-1935). Plums, 1925. Watercolor and graphite on paper. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1934.5⁣

#charlesdemuth #americanmodernism #watercolor #plums #americanart #whatisamerica #addisongalleryofamericanart
...

VOTE! 🗳️ ⁣
⁣
John Sartain (1808-1897) after George Caleb Bingham (1811-1879). The County Election, 1854. Engraving on paper. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, Gift of Mrs. William Simes and Olive Simes, 1941.5⁣
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#johnsartain #georgecalebbingham #countyelection #americanart #whatisamerica #vote #addisongalleryofamericanart

VOTE! 🗳️ ⁣

John Sartain (1808-1897) after George Caleb Bingham (1811-1879). The County Election, 1854. Engraving on paper. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, Gift of Mrs. William Simes and Olive Simes, 1941.5⁣

#johnsartain #georgecalebbingham #countyelection #americanart #whatisamerica #vote #addisongalleryofamericanart
...

“Stare. It is the way to educate your eye, and more. Stare, pry, listen, eavesdrop. Die knowing something. You are not here long.”—Walker Evans⁣
⁣
@phillipsacademy’s own Walker Evans (PA 1922) was born on this day in St. Louis, Missouri in 1903!⁣
⁣
Walker Evans (1903-1975). Fulton Drug Company, c. 1934. Gelatin silver print. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1978.96⁣
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#walkerevans #documentaryphotography #fultondrug #drugstore #exlax #streetphotography #streetscene #newyorkcity #1930s #americanart #whatisamerica #phillipsacademy #addisongalleryofamericanart

“Stare. It is the way to educate your eye, and more. Stare, pry, listen, eavesdrop. Die knowing something. You are not here long.”—Walker Evans⁣

@phillipsacademy’s own Walker Evans (PA 1922) was born on this day in St. Louis, Missouri in 1903!⁣

Walker Evans (1903-1975). Fulton Drug Company, c. 1934. Gelatin silver print. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1978.96⁣

#walkerevans #documentaryphotography #fultondrug #drugstore #exlax #streetphotography #streetscene #newyorkcity #1930s #americanart #whatisamerica #phillipsacademy #addisongalleryofamericanart
...

Happy Halloween from the ghouls and goblins at the Addison Gallery of American Art!⁣
⁣
Photographer unknown. Child in costume, mid-20th century. Chromogenic color print. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, gift of Peter J. Cohen, 2021.72.145⁣/ @pjcohencollection 
⁣
#halloween #vintagehalloween #devil #devilcostume #midcentury #snapshot #vernacularphotography #americanart #whatisamerica #spooky #addisongalleryofamericanart

Happy Halloween from the ghouls and goblins at the Addison Gallery of American Art!⁣

Photographer unknown. Child in costume, mid-20th century. Chromogenic color print. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, gift of Peter J. Cohen, 2021.72.145⁣/ @pjcohencollection

#halloween #vintagehalloween #devil #devilcostume #midcentury #snapshot #vernacularphotography #americanart #whatisamerica #spooky #addisongalleryofamericanart
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Addison updates

Throughout the 2022–23 academic year, the Addison Gallery will host a new public program series featuring leading scholars of American...